Friday, January 19, 2018

Graphs of 2017 global temperatures among record years for major indices

A few days ago, I posted some graphs in an updated style which shows 2017, as seen by TempLS mesh in its place among records years (2017 came second) in a progressive record style. I also showed a detailed graph of the sequence of months from 2014 to 2017, showing how the warming introduced by the El Niño seems to be lasting. I said I would do a similar set of plots for the major indices when they appeared, as I have done in previous years. By now NOAA, HADCRUT and GISS have reported, as well as the satellite indices. So here is the set of progressive record plots. We have so far:
  • GISSlo - Gistemp land/ocean
  • HADCRUT 4 land/ocean
  • NOAAlo - NOAA land/ocean
  • UAH V6.0 - lower troposphere (TLT satellite)
  • RSS V4.0 - lower troposphere (TLT satellite)
  • CRUTEM 4 - land only
  • TempLS mesh
I'll add more as they arrive. You can find more information about the indices, with source links, here. The Glossary may help too. You can flick through the 7 images using the buttons below the plot.

GISS and TempLS had 2017 in second place, as did RSS V4.0. HADCRUT, CRUTEM and NOAAlo put it behind 2015 in third place. UAH V6 had things in a very different order, with 1988 in second place, and 2017 a distant third. The grouping of the surface indices is commonly observed. TempLS mesh and GISS interpolate, giving more (and IMO cdue) weight to polar regions. NOAA and HADCRUT do so much less. So insofar as the warmth of 2017 was accentuated at the poles, the less interpolated indices tend to miss that.

Here is the set of monthly averages for each of those indices, with as before the annual averages shown as horizontal lines in the appropriate color. Almost all months of 2017 were well above the 2014 average, even though 2014 was a record year in its time.






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